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The Department of Anthropology at McMaster University

Anthropology

Anthropologists are no longer found only in far off and exotic locations; they now work in government, private industry, law enforcement, and non-profit organizations, to name just a few. The unique skills and perspectives that an Anthropology degree provides is an understanding about how we are all shaped by the cultural, social, political, and historical contexts in which we live.

Employers identify critical thinking, communication, and problem solving as the most important skills they look for in university graduates. Anthropology emphasizes the use of these important and necessary skills, improves your knowledge about cultural differences, and provides a broad understanding of the experience of being human.

Focus of Study

  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Archaeology
  • Biological Anthropology
  • Culture, Health, & Disease

Marissa Ledger

B.A. Honours, Anthropology, BSc Life Sciences, McMaster University2014


Medical Student, University of Alberta

“Life Sciences gave me some of the background I needed for medical school but my degree in Anthropology was most helpful in establishing my interests in medicine and preparing me to be the best doctor I can be. It gave me an appreciation for different cultures and belief systems that I come across frequently and has made it easier for me to work through tough ethical and cultural conflicts within medicine.”

Applying to the Anthropology Program

 

All Social Sciences students start in the Level 1 program. You will apply for the Anthropology program at the end of your first year. Students must complete the requirements of any Level 1 program, including two courses (6 units) from Level 1 Anthropology 1AA3 and 1AB3.

  • Honours B.A.
    Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ANTHROP 1AA3, 1AB3.

  • Combined Honours B.A.  in Anthropology & Another Subject
    Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ANTHROP 1AA3, 1AB3. Satisfaction of the admission requirements for the Honours program in the other B.A. subject.

  • Minor in Anthropology
    ANTHROP 1AA3 and 1AB3. One of ANTHROP  2E03, 2F03 or 2PA3. Five courses  (or 15 units) of Level 2, 3 or 4 Anthropology.

  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Archaeology
    The Interdisciplinary Minor in Archaeology is based on archaeology and archaeology-related courses offered in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences, and in the Departments of Classics and Anthropology. See the undergraduate calendar for admission requirements.

  • For more information about the Anthropology program, check out the undergraduate calendar and visit the Department of Anthropology’s website.

Honours Anthropology Degree Details

Research & Teaching Facilities

Research Labs

  • Archaeological Ceramic & Lithic Materials Research Lab
  • Archaeology & Physical Anthropology Teaching Labs
  • Centre for Integrated Bioarchaeological Research in Health, Diet, Disease & Migration (Bioarch – HDDM)
  • Fisheries Archaeology Research Centre
  • Lab for Interdisciplinary Research on Archaeological Ceramics (LIRAC)
  • McMaster Ancient DNA Centre
  • McMaster Archaeological XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) Lab
  • Centre for Sustainable Archaeology at McMaster Innovation Park
  • Sensory Ethnography Research Lab at McMaster Innovation Park

Field Schools

Third year Anthropology students have the opportunity to actively participate in research and gain hands on experience in the Archaeological or Bioarchaeological Field Schools.

Build Your Skills

Skills

The unique skills and perspectives that an Anthropology degree provides is an understanding about how we are all shaped by the cultural, social, political, and historical contexts in which we live. Employers identify critical thinking, communication, and problem solving as the most important skills they look for in university graduates. An Anthropology degree emphasizes these important skills, improves your knowledge about cultural differences, and provides a broad understanding of the experience of being human.

The broad aims of the program are:

  • Knowledge about biological, ecological and cultural factors that influence human behaviour
  • Theoretical approaches and practical methods for enhancingcross-cultural understanding
  • An understanding of particular cultures and ethnic groups from a global perspective
  • Skills in social research, qualitative interviewing and field work
  • An understanding of the elements of human evolution and genetics
  • Experience in writing both descriptive reports and analytical papers
  • The ability to analyze the root causes of social problems, and to work towards solutions with people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds

Our graduates have been successful at finding interesting and rewarding careers in a range of fields in both the public and private sectors

Examples of career paths include:

  • International Development/Affairs
  • Market Research
  • Forensics Law/Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement
  • Communications
  • Humanitarian Efforts
  • Education/Outreach
  • Administration/Management
  • Archaeology Ethnography/Cultural Anthropology
  • Cultural Resource Management (CRM)
  • Historic Preservation
  • Consulting/Organizational Development/Training
  • Health (international/public health)
  • Community Development
  • Advocacy (human rights/social justice)
  • Tourism/Heritage
  • Human/Social Services
  • Healthcare Management/Services/Deliver

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