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Transnational ruptures in a time of impunity: Genocide, mining & migration

Public Event Co-organized by IGHC Thur., Oct. 13, 3:30pm - 5:30pm, Council Chamber (GH-111) Transnational ruptures in a time of impunity: Genocide, mining & migration A public lecture by Dr. Catherine Nolin,University of Northern British Colombia

Oct 05, 2016

Transnational ruptures in a time of impunity: Genocide, mining & migration

A public lecture by Dr. Catherine Nolin (University of Northern British Colombia) Location: Council Chambers (Gilmour Hall 111), McMaster University In Central America, overlapping crises of resource extraction, export-driven crop production and gang violence are some of the devastating legacies of the region’s armed conflicts that culminated in state-directed terror and genocide. In Guatemala, Maya activists describe the growing presence of Canadian mining interests as the ‘4th conquest’ – after the 1524 Spanish invasion; 19th century plantation economy; and 1960-1996 armed conflict. The violent transformation of land to ‘property,’ through the dispossession and displacement of Indigenous people, is central to these ‘conquests.’ Using contemporary cases, Dr. Nolin will explore Guatemala in the context of North-South connections and argue for the necessity of a geographically-wide and historically-deep perspective which asks what is our responsibility in the North in creating Guatemala as an exploited country rather than a “developing country”? In doing so, we can build a transnational vision of forced migration and committed research to grapple with the many entanglements across this region. Dr. Catherine Nolin is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Northern British Colombia (UNBC). Her research focuses on the social, cultural, and legal geographies of Guatemalan political violence with particular emphasis on gendered experiences of state-sponsored and contemporary violence, transnational migration to Canada from Central America, migrant insecurity at the Guatemala-Mexico border, social justice, indigenous rights, and transnational solidarity. Most recently, she has worked on issues of femicide/feminicide, the violent development of Canadian mining in Central America, and critical development studies.
 
Oct 13 2016, 3:30pm - 5:30pm EDT
ON, Hamilton, L8S 4S4, McMaster University - Gilmour Hall 111

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