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Freeman Bonnie, Assistant Professor

Bonnie Freeman

Assistant Professor

Faculty
School of Social Work

Area(s) of Interest:

Research Snaps

Biography

Bonnie Freeman is Algonquin/Mohawk from the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in Ontario, Canada. She recently completed a Ph.D. in Social Work from Wilfrid Laurier University and has transitioned into a tenure-track Assistant Professorship with the School of Social Work at McMaster University beginning July 2015.  She brings many years of practice experience, with work rooted in connections with Six Nations, the Hamilton Aboriginal Community, as well as many other Indigenous communities throughout Canada and the United States.

Bonnie’s dissertation research with the Six Nations Haudenosaunee youth known as the “Spirit of the Youth,” captures a youth led journey traveling on foot through their ancestral lands while promoting the message of peace and unity to their Haudenosaunee relatives and communities.  This works also highlights the voices of the youth, especially when they present their ‘Youth Declaration’ to leaders at the United Nations.  As a result, the dissertation reveals the significance of transformation with identity and well-being as an outcome of agency and resilience possessed by Onkwehonwe youth while engaged in culture-based activism.

In 2010, she received the Native Research Network Honored Student Award at their annual conference in South Dakota, USA.   Bonnie is also certified in Equine Assisted Growth and Learning and has developed and implemented in collaboration with the Hamilton Métis Women’s Circle, Equine Assisted Growth and Learning programs to Aboriginal High School students and Native women. She currently serves on the board of Six Nations Polytechnic and chairs the Indigenous Education Council with Indigenous Studies, as well the Circle of Indigenous Social Work Action committee in the School of Social Work.

Research & Supervisory Interests

Bonnie’s research interests include: Aboriginal youth, women and cultural based activism; Indigenous cultural interventions in social work practice; Indigenous collective and community health and wellness approaches; Equine and Animal Assisted Interventions, and Aboriginal perspectives on anti-oppressive practices and decolonization

Administrative Responsibilities:

  • Collaborative Social Work Committees:  Bridging Indigenous and Settlers Alliance; Anti-Oppressive Education and Circle of Indigenous Social Work Action – focus on Decolonizing Social Work and an Indigenous Pathway in Social Work.  Sept. 2015 to 2016.
  •  McMaster Indigenous Education Council, McMaster Indigenous Studies Program, member since, Fall 2013.  Academic Chair, July 1, 2014 – 2017 (3 year term)
  • Aboriginal Issue Committee/ Circle of Indigenous Social Work Action,
  • School of Social Work, member since 2009; Chair since 2011.
  •  McMaster Field Instruction Committee, McMaster School of Social Work, member since Fall 2013.

Education

  • Wilfrid Laurier University, PhD in Social Work (2015)
  • Dissertation title: The Spirit of Haudenosaunee Youth: The Transformation of Identity and Well-being through Culture-based Activism
  • MSW (Practice), McMaster University, 2005
  • Thesis title: Resiliency of a People: A Haudenosaunee Concept of Helping.
  • BSW, McMaster University, 2003
  • BA (Sociology), McMaster University, 2000
  • Mohawk College Brant-Elgin Campus, Native Community Care Counselling and Community Development Program - Honours Diploma, 1992

Teaching

Undergraduate

  • Sept 2015 - April 2016: SOC WORK 3D06 & 3DD6 – Field Placement Seminar and Field Placements

 – McMaster School of Social Work, Hamilton, ON.

  • Jan 2015 – April 2015: ANTH 370/NAST 370 Issues in Contemporary Native Communities in Canada 

– Six Nations Polytechnic and St. Paul University College, Waterloo, ON

  • Sept 2014 - April 2015: SOC WORK 3D06 & 3DD6 – Field Placement Seminar and Field Placements 

– McMaster School of Social Work, Hamilton, ON.

  • Sept - Dec. 2014: SOC WORK 4G04 – Selected Topics: Indigenizing Social Work.

- McMaster School of Social Work, Hamilton, ON.

  • Sept - Dec., 2013: SOC WORK 4I03 – Social Work with Indigenous People. 

- McMaster School of Social Work. Hamilton, ON.

  • April - June, 2013: SWREN 411R:  Integrative Practice:  Aboriginal Perspectives and Social Work.  

-Renison College, University of Waterloo. Waterloo, ON.

  • Sept – Dec, 2010: SOC WORK 4G03 – Selected Topics:  Indigenous Knowledge, Social Work and Social Change

- McMaster University, School of Social Work.  Hamilton, ON.

  • March - May, 2009: AK/SOWK 4270 – Canadian Indian Policy and Social Welfare:  Historical and Contemporary Contexts.  

-York University, School of Social Work.  Toronto, ON.

  • Jan. – April 2007: SWP 22 – Social Welfare Policies and Programs (part 2) 

-Ryerson University, School of Social Work.  Toronto, ON 

  • Sept. – Dec., 2006: AK/SOWK 4270 – Canadian Indian Policy and Social Welfare:  Historical and Contemporary Contexts. 

- York University, School of Social Work.  Toronto, ON.

Graduate

  • Jan – April 2015:  SW705 – Direct Readings: Identity and ‘Whiteness’ 

-McMaster School of Social Work, Hamilton, ON

  • May – August, 2014: SW705 – Direct Readings:  Indigenous Methodologies 

-McMaster School of Social Work. Hamilton, ON 

  • Jan – April, 2014: SW722 – Topics in Advanced Social Work:  Anti-Oppression, Decolonization & Alliances with Indigenous Peoples.  

-McMaster School of Social Work.  Hamilton, ON.

  • Jan - April, 2006: SW 722 - Topics in Advanced Social Work:  Issues in Practice and Policy in Aboriginal Health.  

-MSW Program.  McMaster University, School of Social Work.  Hamilton, ON.

 

Research

Two Row Partnership – McMaster and Deyohahá:ge: Indigenous Knowledge Centre, Six Nations Polytechnic

The Two Row Research Partnership (TRRP) is composed of a case study group that includes indigenous scholars, graduate students and community-based scholars and graduate students  with the emphasize on capacity-building and co-creating the Two Row methodology to increase the accessibility of Indigenous humanities and social sciences research among academic and non-academic audiences.  This is done by generating and assessing Indigenous archives, mentoring emerging scholars, hosting workshops-conferences, publishing curricular and scholarly materials, and posting digital resources for the Six Nations community, as well building its network of Indigenous and non-Indigenous neighbors.

*Currently in the process of applying for SSHRC grant

Selected Publications

Peer-reviewed

Contributions to Books
Baines, D. & Freeman, B.  (2011). Work, Care, Resistance, and Mothering: An Indigenous Perspective, (p. 67-80).  In Catherine Krull & Justyna Sempruch (eds), A Life in Balance?  Reopening the Family-Work Debate.  Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Freeman, B. (2010).  Indigenous Pathways to Anti-oppressive Practice, (p. 115-131), in D. Baines (ed), Doing Anti-Oppressive Practice: Building Transformative Politicized Social Work, 2nd edition.  Blackpoint, NS: Fernwood Publishing.

Freeman, B. (2007).  Indigenous Pathways to Anti-oppressive Practice (p. 95-110), in D. Baines (ed), Doing Anti-Oppressive Practice: Building Transformative Politicized Social Work, 1st edition.  Blackpoint, NS: Fernwood Publishing.

Journal Articles
Haring, R. C., Hudson, M., Taualii, M., & Freeman, B. (2015).  First Nations, Maori, American Indians, and Native Hawaiians as Sovereigns: EAP with Indigenous Nations within Nations (GLOBAL).  Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health, April 2015, 1 (1): p. 14-31.

 Haring, R. C., Freeman, B., Guiffrida, A. L. & Dennis, M. L. (2012).  Relationship Building for a Healthy Future: Indigenous Youth Pathways for Resiliency and Recovery.  Journal of Indigenous Social Development, 1 (1): p. 1-17.
 
Freeman, B. & Lee, B. (2007).  An Aboriginal Community Model.  Native Social Work Journal. 6: 97-120.


Presentations at Meeting

2015                                       

The Spirit of Haudenosaunee Youth: The Resilience and Self-determination of Native Youth at the Healing Our Spirit Worldwide, 7th Gathering in Mauri Ora, University of Waikato, New Zealand.

Researching Back, Researching Ourselves:  Building Not Extracting Community Knowledge and Resources in Black, Indigenous Communities and Communities of Colour – Roundtable Panel with Gitanijali Lena, Shazia Islam, Lori Chambers and Bonnie Freeman.  At the Critical Ethnic Studies Association Conference: Sovereignties Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession at York University.

2014                                       

International Women’s and Children’s Health Conference.  Hamilton, ON:  Guest Speaker Workshop:  Rising Beyond The Conflict:  The Resilience and Well-being of Native Youth.  Hosted by the International Women’s and Children’s Health Group.

McMaster Indigenous Children’s Health Symposium.  McMaster Innovation Park, Hamilton, ON.  Guest Speaker and panelist:  The Spirit of Native Youth: Self-determination and Resilience through Culture-based Activism.  Hosted by:  Aboriginal Health Interest Group, Global Health Committee, LGBTQ2+ Interest Group, Pediatric Interest Group and Public Health Interest Group.

The Spirit of Haudenosaunee Youth:  The Resilience and Self-determination.  Native Research Network Conference in Phoenix, Arizona

 2013                        

United Voices:  A community forum on violence against Indigenous women in Canada.  Sponsored by the McMaster First Nations Student Association.

McMaster University:  Stopping Violence Against Women – Panelist.  Conference organized by: Dr. Maroussia Ahmed

The Spirit of the Youth Unity Run: the Mobility of Self-determination and Cultural Resiliency of Haudenosaunee Youth.  Panel Speaker.  Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference.  Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

2012                                       

Emerging Models of Wholistic Healing: Cultural Resiliency, Vision &Self-determination.  Keynote Speaker. Wilfrid Laurier School of Social Work, Aboriginal Wellness Conference.

The Spirit of Haudenosaunee Youth: Reclaiming Identity & Well-being through Cultural Activism. Panel Speaker. Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference.  Uncasville, Connecticut

 

 


Community Connections

Six Nations, Hamilton Aboriginal Community and many other Aborigianl communities in Canada and United States