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Fractures of the radius and ulna bones, anterior and posterior views. Line block print after R.W. Smith, 1862.

AJPA Editor’s Choice: McMaster Anthropology

McMaster anthropologist and former graduate students’ work on intersectionality in bioarchaeology has been selected as Editor’s Choice in American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

Mar 05, 2021

A recent article by former anthropology graduate student Madeleine Mant (PhD, 2016), professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair Megan Brickley, and Carlina de la Cova (University of South Carolina) has been selected as the American Journal of Physical Anthropology Editor’s Choice. One article is selected per issue based upon the judged impact of the topic and the scientific quality of the work. The article, “Intersectionality and trauma analysis in bioarchaeology” discusses how the field’s engagement with this key theoretical framework (named and developed by Kimberlé Crenshaw) has become increasingly explicit in recent years. The authors use contrasting case studies of two individuals who died in hospitals and were unclaimed after death, to explore the theoretical and methodological application of intersectionality to investigations of accidental and interpersonal trauma. A broken bone is the intersecting result of biological, histomorphological, sociocultural, and behavioural factors. Incorporating intersectionality into bioarchaeology allows for a better acknowledgement of the inherent complexity of past lives, elevating and amplifying previously silenced voices. In this way, intersectionality in bioarchaeology demands social justice. 

Editor’s Choice articles are available freely for two months after publication. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.24226

Figure: Fractures of the radius and ulna bones, anterior and posterior views. Line block print after R.W. Smith, 1862. Credit: Wellcome Collection. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)