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Bioarchaeology of Metabolic Bone Disease, Second Edition

Professor Megan Brickley has co-authored a new book, "Bioarchaeology of Metabolic Bone Disease, Second Edition," for researchers of anthropology, bioarchaeology and archaeology.

Sep 01, 2020

The Bioarchaeology of Metabolic Bone Disease, Second Edition is a comprehensive source dedicated to better understanding this group of conditions that have significant consequences for health in both past and present communities on a global scale. 

This edition presents an updated introduction to the biology and metabolism of mineralised tissues that are fundamental to understanding the expression of the metabolic bone diseases in skeletal remains. The extensive advances in understanding of these conditions in both bioarchaeological and biomedical work are brought together for the reader. Dedicated chapters focussing on each disease emphasise the integration of up-to-date clinical background with the biological basis of disease progression to give guidance on identification. New chapters covering anaemia and approaches to recognising the co-occurrence of pathological conditions have been included, reflecting recent advances in research. Boxes highlighting significant issues, use of information from sources such as texts and nonhuman primates, and theoretical approaches are included in the text. Each chapter closes with ‘Core Concepts’ that summarise key information. The final chapter reviews current challenges in bioarchaeology and provides directions for future research. 

About the authors:

Megan B. Brickley, Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the Bioarchaeology of Human Disease at the Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Canada; Rachel Ives, Curator of Anthropology, Natural History Museum, London, UK and Simon Mays, Human Skeletal Biologist, Historic England, UK.