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Sherine Hamdy Hooker Series poster

Medical Anthropologist and Distinguished Visiting Professor Dr. Sherine Hamdy to give two talks March 24 & 25

Departmental Lecture “Comics and Academia” Tuesday, March 24, 3:30-5:00 p.m., LRW 1003. Public Lecture “Doctors in the Arab Spring: The Case of Egypt” Wednesday, March 25, 3:00-5:00 p.m., MDCL 3020, Reception to follow, Farncombe Atrium

Feb 13, 2020

 

Lectures are Co-sponsored by the Harry Lyman Hooker Distinguished Visiting Professor Program, the Department of Anthropology, the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Hannah History of Medicine and Medical Humanities Speaker Series, Faculty of Health Sciences. The Hannah History of Medicine and Medical Humanities Speaker Series is made possible by an endowment from Associated Medical Services, AMS. 

Departmental Lecture “Comics and Academia”
Tuesday, March 24, 3:30-5:00 p.m., LRW 1003.

Drawing on examples from Lissa: A Story of Friendship, Medical Promise, and Revolution (University of Toronto/EthnoGRAPHICS, 2017) and from her forthcoming graphic novel Jabs, about an Egyptian-American girl starting college in the US, Professor Hamdy demonstrates the effectiveness of comics as media for teaching and challenging stereotypes about Arabs and Muslim Americans.

 

Public Lecture “Doctors in the Arab Spring: The Case of Egypt”
Wednesday, March 25, 3:00-5:00 p.m., MDCL 3020, Reception to follow, Farncombe Atrium

Focusing on the involvement of physicians and street medics in the protests that began in Tahrir Square in January 2011 and continued after the ouster of President Mubarak, Professor Hamdy puts the role of doctors in political conflict in longer historical context, and illuminates how they themselves become targets for documenting the police and military violence against civilians for which the state vehemently denies responsibility.

 

Professor Sherine Hamdy (PhD New York University, 2006) is a medical anthropologist whose research focuses on bioethics, Islam, and health care practices in Egypt.  Her 2012 book, Our Bodies Belong to God: Organ Transplants, Islam, and the Struggle for Human Dignity in Egypt has been described as “the best ethnography yet available on Islamic ethical reasoning and medical practice.” Professor Hamdy has also pioneered the use of graphic novels in teaching and communication of anthropological insights.  Her 2017 graphic novel Lissa: A Story of Friendship, Medical Promise, and Revolution, is a riveting story about medical crisis, social inequality and revolution in Egypt.