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Mapping the Global Dimensions of Policy Conference

The conference—organized by McMaster’s political science department, the Institute for Globalization and the Human Condition (IGHC) and Canada Research Chair in Public Policy and Globalization, Stephen McBride—will feature panels on a wide range of topics relating to global policy, including migration and borders, climate change, science and technology, human capital, and the role of international organizations.

Jan 01, 2012

In the wake of financial meltdowns and occupy movements, Gross National Happiness might seem like a more humane national goal than material wealth, and His Majesty Jigme Singye Wangchuk has applied the principle in the Kingdom of Bhutan.


But Adam Malloy, a PhD student at the Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo, sees something more sinister in the program.


Malloy is one of more than two-dozen graduate students presenting papers at McMaster University’s Mapping the Global Dimensions of Policy conference, taking place January 26-27 at McMaster University. In his paper, Malloy challenges the principle of Gross National Happiness in the context of Bhutan’s modernization and ethnic tensions. 


The conference—organized by McMaster’s political science department, the Institute for Globalization and the Human Condition (IGHC) and Canada Research Chair in Public Policy and Globalization, Stephen McBride—will feature panels on a wide range of topics relating to global policy, including migration and borders, climate change, science and technology, human capital, and the role of international organizations. 


Graduate students from across the country will present papers that will be discussed by experts in the field from McMaster University.


“This conference is a great opportunity for graduate students from across North American universities to share their research interests and get really constructive feedback from world-renowned faculty,” said Scott Smith, a conference organizer and PhD student in McMaster’s political science department. 
“It’s also an opportunity to showcase McMaster’s strengths in the internationalization of public policy from the perspective of different departments and institutes.” 


Distinguished academics from other universities are also attending as guest speakers. Daniel Béland, Canada Research Chair in Public Policy and professor at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan, will lecture on public policy and transnational actors, while York University School of Public Policy and Administration professor Thaddeus Hwong will deliver a paper entitled “Money Can’t Buy You Happiness, but Taxation Can Give You a Chance.”


Grace Skogstad and Phil Triadafilopoulos, both political science professors at the University of Toronto, will lecture on transnationalism and multiculticulturalism, respectively.


The conference runs from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. followed by a reception on Thursday, Jan. 26, and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., including a complimentary lunch, on Friday, Jan. 27. 


Registration is free and open until Jan. 20, but spaces are limited.


For more information about the conference, visit www.politicalscience.mcmaster.ca/globalization-conference, or contact the organizing committee at globalization.conference@mcmaster.ca.