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Marshall Tara, Associate Professor | Director, Honours Social Psychology Program

photo of Tara Marshall

Tara Marshall

Associate Professor | Director, Honours Social Psychology Program

Faculty
Social Psychology Program

Faculty
Department of Health Aging & Society

Area(s) of Interest:

Biography

I am a social psychologist whose research program investigates micro- and macro-level influences on close relationships and mental health. My research seeks answers to the following questions:

How does culture influence close relationships and mental health?

Drawing on qualitative and quantitative research methods, I examine sociocultural constructions of close relationships and the ways that they contribute to mental health and well-being. How do people experience relationship formation, maintenance, and breakups in a diverse range of cultures? I have also been studying immigrant couples: how are their relationships influenced by the process of acculturation, and simultaneously, how is their process of acculturation influenced by their relationships? Do secure relationships enhance immigrants' adaptation and well-being?

How does social isolation influence mental health and well-being?

The absence of close relationships - romantic, friendship, and family - is associated with poorer mental health and well-being. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, my research explores experiences of social isolation in university students and older adults.

How does social media influence close relationships?

Using experimental and longitudinal research designs, I am investigating the ways that people use social media to keep tabs on current and former romantic partners and whether it has a negative impact on their well-being. I am also examining whether people who tend to be anxiously attached in their relationships (i.e., feeling unworthy of love and fearing abandonment) are more prone to social media surveillance, and in turn, experience heightened jealousy and negative emotions.

Do personality traits predict social media behaviour?

My research examines whether the Big Five and Dark Triad personality traits predict the use of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, the content of one's posts, and the social response (e.g., likes/reactions/comments/retweets) one receives. Do people with certain personality traits (e.g., narcissism) particularly crave a strong social response to their social media posts, and how do they feel if they do not receive it?

What is the connection between aging, social media use, and well-being?

Recently, I have become interested in the ways that older adults use social media and whether it influences their well-being differentially compared to younger adults. For example, who do older adults compare themselves to when they browse social media and on what dimensions of comparison (e.g., physical health, lifestyle, social activity)? How do these social comparisons influence their mental health and well-being?

Education

PhD in Psychology, University of Toronto (2005)

MA in Psychology, University of Toronto (2000)

BA Honours in Psychology, Queen’s University (1998)

Research

Cardon, A., & Marshall, T. C. (in press). To raise a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A qualitative, comparative study of caregiver experiences in the United States and Senegal, West Africa. Transcultural Psychiatry.

Lefringhausen, K., Ferenczi, N., & Marshall, T. C. (in press). Self-protection and growth as the motivational force behind majority group members’ cultural adaptation and discrimination: A parallel mediation model via intergroup contact and threats. International Journal of Psychology

Marshall, T. C., Ferenczi, N., Lefringhausen, K., Hill, S., & Deng, J. (2018). Intellectual, narcissistic, or Machiavellian? How Twitter users differ from Facebook-only users, why they use Twitter, and what they tweet about. Psychology of Popular Media Culture. Link to article

Hill, S., & Marshall, T. C. (2018). Beliefs about sexual assault in India and Britain are explained by attitudes toward women and sexism. Sex Roles, 79, 421-430. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T. C., & Bejanyan, K. (2017). Are sex differences in antisocial and prosocial Facebook use explained by narcissism and relational self-construal? Computers in Human Behavior, 77, 25-31. Link to article                                                                                                                                  

Lefringhausen, K., & Marshall, T. C. (2016). Locals’ bidimensional acculturation model: Validation and associations with psychological and sociocultural adjustment outcomes. Cross-Cultural Research, 50, 356-392. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., & Marshall, T. C. (2016). Meeting the expectations of your heritage culture: Links between attachment orientations, intragroup marginalization, and psychological adjustment. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 33, 101-121. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T.C., Lefringhausen, K., & Bejanyan, K. (2016). Associations of insecure attachment with extreme pro-group actions: The mediating role of perceived marginalisation. Personality and Individual Differences, 91, 84-88. Link to article

Whelan, J., Johnson, A. R., Marshall, T. C., & Thomson, M. (2016). Relational domain switching: Interpersonal insecurity predicts the strength and number of marketplace relationships. Psychology & Marketing, 33, 465-479. Link to article

Altweck, L., Marshall, T. C., Ferenczi, N., & Lefringhausen, K. (2015). Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 1272, 1-17. Link to article

Altweck, L., & Marshall, T. C. (2015). When you have lived in a different culture, does returning “home” not feel like home? Predictors of psychological re-adjustment. PLOS ONE, 10(5), e0124393. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Lefringhausen, K., & Ferenczi, N. (2015). The Big Five, self-esteem, and narcissism as predictors of the topics people write about in Facebook status updates. Personality and Individual Differences, 85, 35-40. Link to article

Bejanyan, K., Marshall, T. C., & Ferenczi, N. (2015). Associations of collectivism with relationship commitment, passion, and mate selection: Opposing roles of parental influence and family allocentrism. PLOS ONE, 10, e0117374. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T. C., & Bejanyan, K. (2015). The protective and detrimental effects of self-construal on perceived rejection from heritage culture members. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 100. Link to article

Bejanyan, K., Marshall, T. C., & Ferenczi, N. (2014). Romantic ideals, mate preferences, and anticipation of future difficulties in marital life: A comparative study of young adults in India and America. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 1355. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., & Marshall, T. C. (2013). Exploring attachment to the “homeland” and its association with heritage culture identification. PLOS ONE, 8, e53872. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Bejanyan, K., Di Castro, G., & Lee, R. A. (2013). Attachment styles as predictors of Facebook-related jealousy and surveillance in romantic relationships. Personal Relationships, 20, 1-22. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Bejanyan, K., & Ferenczi, N. (2013). Attachment styles and personal growth following romantic breakups: The mediating roles of distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound. PLOS ONE, 8(9), e75161. Link to article

Goodwin, R., Marshall, T., Fülöp, M., Adonu, J., Spiewak, S. Neto, F., & Hernandez Plaza, S. (2012). Mate value and self-esteem: Evidence from eight cultural groups. PLOS One, 7, e36106. Link to article

MacDonald, G., Marshall, T. C., Gere, J., Shimotomai, A., & Lies, J. (2012). Valuing romantic relationships: The role of family approval across cultures. Cross-Cultural Research, 46, 366-393. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2012a). Facebook surveillance of former romantic partners: Associations with post-breakup recovery and personal growth. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15, 521-526. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2012b). Attachment and amae in Japanese romantic relationships. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 15, 89-100. Link to article

Pinkus, R. T., Lockwood, P. J., Marshall, T. C., & Yoon, H. M. (2012). Responses to comparisons in romantic relationships: Empathy, shared fate, reflection, and contrast. Personal Relationships, 19, 182-201. Link to article

Campbell, L. C., & Marshall, T. C. (2011). Anxious attachment and relationship processes: An interactionist perspective. Journal of Personality, 79, 917-947. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Chuong, K., & Aikawa, A. (2011). Day-to-day experiences of amae in Japanese romantic relationships. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 14, 26-35. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2010). Love at the cultural crossroads: Intimacy and commitment in Chinese Canadian relationships. Personal Relationships, 17, 391-411. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2009). Gender, peer relations, and intimate romantic relationships. In D. McCreary & J. Chrisler (Eds.), Handbook of gender research in psychology. New York, NY: Springer. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2008). Cultural differences in intimacy: The influence of gender-role ideology and individualism-collectivism. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 25, 143-168. Link to article

Lockwood, P. J., Marshall, T. C., & Sadler, P. (2005). Promoting success or preventing failure: Cultural differences in motivation by positive and negative role models. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 379-392. Link to article

Tafarodi, R. W., Marshall, T. C., & Katsura, H. (2004). Standing out in Canada and Japan. Journal of Personality, 72, 785-814. Link to article

Tafarodi, R. W., Marshall, T. C., & Milne, A. B. (2003). Self-esteem and memory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 29-45. Link to article