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Marshall Tara, Associate Professor

photo of Tara Marshall

Tara Marshall

Associate Professor

Faculty
Social Psychology Program

Faculty
Department of Health Aging & Society

Area(s) of Interest:

Biography

Tara Marshall is a social psychologist whose research program investigates micro- and macro-level influences on mental health and well-being. In particular, she draws on attachment theory to seek answers to two main questions: how do anxiously-attached individuals navigate their close relationships in a time when social media use and globalization are increasingly ubiquitous, and how might these relationships be improved through interventions that mitigate fears of abandonment and enhance feelings of self-worth? In a second strand of research, she is examining attitudes towards women, multiculturalism, and mental health across cultures. Last, she is investigating the Big Five and Dark Triad personality traits as predictors of social media behaviour across the lifespan.

Education

PhD in Social Psychology, University of Toronto (2005)

MA in Social Psychology, University of Toronto (2000)

BA Honours in Psychology, Queen’s University (1998)

Research

Marshall, T. C., Ferenczi, N., Lefringhausen, K., Hill, S., & Deng, J. (2018). Intellectual, narcissistic, or Machiavellian? How Twitter users differ from Facebook-only users, why they use Twitter, and what they tweet about. Psychology of Popular Media Culture. Link to article

Hill, S., & Marshall, T. C. (2018). Beliefs about sexual assault in India and Britain are explained by attitudes toward women and sexism. Sex Roles. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T. C., & Bejanyan, K. (2017). Are sex differences in antisocial and prosocial Facebook use explained by narcissism and relational self-construal? Computers in Human Behavior, 77, 25-31. Link to article                                                                                                                                  

Lefringhausen, K., & Marshall, T. C. (2016). Locals’ bidimensional acculturation model: Validation and associations with psychological and sociocultural adjustment outcomes. Cross-Cultural Research, 50, 356-392. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., & Marshall, T. C. (2016). Meeting the expectations of your heritage culture: Links between attachment orientations, intragroup marginalization, and psychological adjustment. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 33, 101-121. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T.C., Lefringhausen, K., & Bejanyan, K. (2016). Associations of insecure attachment with extreme pro-group actions: The mediating role of perceived marginalisation. Personality and Individual Differences, 91, 84-88. Link to article

Whelan, J., Johnson, A. R., Marshall, T. C., & Thomson, M. (2016). Relational domain switching: Interpersonal insecurity predicts the strength and number of marketplace relationships. Psychology & Marketing, 33, 465-479. Link to article

Altweck, L., Marshall, T. C., Ferenczi, N., & Lefringhausen, K. (2015). Mental health literacy: a cross-cultural approach to knowledge and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and generalized anxiety disorder. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 1272, 1-17. Link to article

Altweck, L., & Marshall, T. C. (2015). When you have lived in a different culture, does returning “home” not feel like home? Predictors of psychological re-adjustment. PLOS ONE, 10(5), e0124393. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Lefringhausen, K., & Ferenczi, N. (2015). The Big Five, self-esteem, and narcissism as predictors of the topics people write about in Facebook status updates. Personality and Individual Differences, 85, 35-40. Link to article

Bejanyan, K., Marshall, T. C., & Ferenczi, N. (2015). Associations of collectivism with relationship commitment, passion, and mate selection: Opposing roles of parental influence and family allocentrism. PLOS ONE, 10, e0117374. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., Marshall, T. C., & Bejanyan, K. (2015). The protective and detrimental effects of self-construal on perceived rejection from heritage culture members. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 100. Link to article

Bejanyan, K., Marshall, T. C., & Ferenczi, N. (2014). Romantic ideals, mate preferences, and anticipation of future difficulties in marital life: A comparative study of young adults in India and America. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 1355. Link to article

Ferenczi, N., & Marshall, T. C. (2013). Exploring attachment to the “homeland” and its association with heritage culture identification. PLOS ONE, 8, e53872. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Bejanyan, K., Di Castro, G., & Lee, R. A. (2013). Attachment styles as predictors of Facebook-related jealousy and surveillance in romantic relationships. Personal Relationships, 20, 1-22. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Bejanyan, K., & Ferenczi, N. (2013). Attachment styles and personal growth following romantic breakups: The mediating roles of distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound. PLOS ONE, 8(9), e75161. Link to article

Goodwin, R., Marshall, T., Fülöp, M., Adonu, J., Spiewak, S. Neto, F., & Hernandez Plaza, S. (2012). Mate value and self-esteem: Evidence from eight cultural groups. PLOS One, 7, e36106. Link to article

MacDonald, G., Marshall, T. C., Gere, J., Shimotomai, A., & Lies, J. (2012). Valuing romantic relationships: The role of family approval across cultures. Cross-Cultural Research, 46, 366-393. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2012a). Facebook surveillance of former romantic partners: Associations with post-breakup recovery and personal growth. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15, 521-526. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2012b). Attachment and amae in Japanese romantic relationships. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 15, 89-100. Link to article

Pinkus, R. T., Lockwood, P. J., Marshall, T. C., & Yoon, H. M. (2012). Responses to comparisons in romantic relationships: Empathy, shared fate, reflection, and contrast. Personal Relationships, 19, 182-201. Link to article

Campbell, L. C., & Marshall, T. C. (2011). Anxious attachment and relationship processes: An interactionist perspective. Journal of Personality, 79, 917-947. Link to article

Marshall, T. C., Chuong, K., & Aikawa, A. (2011). Day-to-day experiences of amae in Japanese romantic relationships. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 14, 26-35. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2010). Love at the cultural crossroads: Intimacy and commitment in Chinese Canadian relationships. Personal Relationships, 17, 391-411. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2009). Gender, peer relations, and intimate romantic relationships. In D. McCreary & J. Chrisler (Eds.), Handbook of gender research in psychology. New York, NY: Springer. Link to article

Marshall, T. C. (2008). Cultural differences in intimacy: The influence of gender-role ideology and individualism-collectivism. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 25, 143-168. Link to article

Lockwood, P. J., Marshall, T. C., & Sadler, P. (2005). Promoting success or preventing failure: Cultural differences in motivation by positive and negative role models. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 31, 379-392. Link to article

Tafarodi, R. W., Marshall, T. C., & Katsura, H. (2004). Standing out in Canada and Japan. Journal of Personality, 72, 785-814. Link to article

Tafarodi, R. W., Marshall, T. C., & Milne, A. B. (2003). Self-esteem and memory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 29-45. Link to article